Using WP-CLI

I practically rolled my eyes when I was notified that there was a new update to WordPress available. It has always been a bit of pain ssh’ing into the server, using wget to retrieve the latest release, and blindly overwriting the installation. Sure it’s not the most demanding thing I’ve done today but considering how low-trafficked this blog is it’s still annoying. Wanting to still keep up with security patches I discovered a tool called wp-cli that helps automate a lot of things.

$ wp core update
Updating to version 4.7.4 (en_US)...
Downloading update from https://downloads.wordpress.org/release/wordpress-4.7.4-partial-3.zip...
Unpacking the update...
Success: WordPress updated successfully.

I’m a very happy individual.

Counter Strike: Global Offensive

Counter Strike will always have a special place in my heart. I remember the Counter Strike community being split due to the introduction of Steam back in 2003. Counter Strike 1.6, Condition Zero, and Source however took up most of my free time as a teenager. Back in mid 2012 I purchased Counter Strike: Global Offensive. I’m not the most skilled and I’ve never taken the competitive aspects too seriously, but I enjoyed the game as a casual player as the years have passed.

It was around late 2012 where I met two random people while playing. I vividly remember like it was yesterday and yet looking back it seemed like such a nonsiginicant first incounter. The game mode was Demolition, the map was Sugarcane, and the only reason I had received a friend request was because I had briefly used my mic during the match to instruct one of our teammates that it was clear to defuse. These two players would go on to help fill an empty void I didn’t know I even had.

A few others joined our group as time went on and we met and merged with a separate group of friends whom we had a run in against in one of our competitive matches (they kicked our asses for the record). The seven or so of us would go on to play almost every night for the next two years. Our voice chat of choice started out as just in-game, then Skype, then Teamspeak.

I probably would have stopped playing Global Offensive after 50 hours if it wasn’t for the various friends I’ve made since its release. Solo queuing has always been hit or miss (mostly miss) for me. I have 397 competitive match wins and 998 hours logged into the game.

So what happened? Was there a big fallout that split us up? No, we just kind of… moved on with life and stopped playing I guess is the best way to put it. There never was a planned ‘last game’ at all. It’s as if no one saw it coming. One of us moved onto Battlefield 4 however I was unable to follow due to low performance on my computer at the time, another was playing Overwatch last I heard but that was about a year ago when it first came out. I played with another briefly during Rainbow Six Siege’s early days but that just didn’t last long. Meanwhile I graduated university and have since started my carrier and I absolutely couldn’t imagine playing a video game for 2-3 hours every weekday night.

I started up Counter Strike: Global Offensive for the first time in almost three years recently and it feels completely foreign to me now.

Personal Observations On What.CD’s Shutdown

What.CD shutdown back in November and since then I’ve been on Spotify. It’s probably the best thing to ever happen to my appreciation for music.

Yeah, I know. Put the pitchforks down and let me explain. I’ve been on What.CD since early 2012 and as the years went on I developed a bit of a bubble. I was listening to the same albums daily not because of my own willing ignorance but because discovering new artists and expanding my musical taste was very limited. It’s just not something What.CD did well.

What.CD’s shutdown allowed me to explore and experiment with paid services which eventually lead me to Spotify. I’ll admit that streaming music at first was a bit unappealing to me but now that I’ve been on Spotify for a few months I just can’t see myself listening to music any other way. The discover weekly and release radar features have been a much welcome change but the appeal of never having to edit an ID3 tag ever again is great.